Greater Norwich Local Plan

DRPC’s summary of reasons in responding to the GNLP

Dickleburgh and Rushall Parish Council has carefully considered the proposals contained in the Greater Norwich Local Plan (GNLP). After careful discussion of the development options, and after two public consultations with residents of the village, the Council will be posting its response online.

We thought it would be useful to summarise the reasons behind our proposals.

You can complete the survey on-line at www.gnlp.org.uk

Or you can request a paper questionnaire from the Parish Clerk, Ann Baker on 01379 742937 or clerkdrpc@yahoo.co.uk

As a community, we are committed to playing our part in the GNLP’s plan for future housing. We believe some new housing, particularly that which is affordable, is important for the future health and prosperity of our village.

At the same time, it is essential that this growth is sustainable, proportionate and sited so that it does not place an intolerable strain on the infrastructure and character of Dickleburgh or Rushall.

Currently, the most urgent problem facing Dickleburgh concerns roads. Each of the three roads in the centre of the village is already experiencing major traffic problems. It is essential, for reasons of safety to residents and drivers, that these are not exacerbated.

The Street in an extremely narrow road which, in spite of 20mph speed limit (widely ignored by drivers) struggles to cope with traffic, in particular heavy goods vehicles going to and from the Smurfit Kappa depot in Rushall.

Rectory Road, with houses on each side, parked cars and no pedestrian crossing has become very dangerous to pedestrians. Again, lorries from Smurfit Kappa are the main problem.

Harvey Lane, a narrow road on which the school, playground and village centre are situated, has had widely-publicised problems of congestion which will be worsened by a development of 22 houses, currently under construction.

The Parish Council is determined that what is already a bad and dangerous traffic situation in Dickleburgh must not be made worse by any new housing development. For this reason, we strongly oppose any potential sites that will add to the traffic on those three roads.

Our opposition includes sites on the Norwich Road to the north of the village. Local experience has shown that drivers will avoid the difficult junction on to the A140 to the north of the village, preferring to use the roundabout to the south. In other words, any Norwich Road development would add to pressure on The Street.

Any future development should, in the view of the Parish Council – supported by an opinion poll taken among residents – take place to the south of the village off the Ipswich Road. Houses there would provide new residents with safe and easy pedestrian access to the village services, without adding to Dickleburgh’s traffic problems.

A survey for our proposed Neighbourhood Plan revealed, in addition, that residents on the Rectory Road greatly value the prospect from the village of Dickleburgh Moor, which is being developed as a wildlife site. In other words, development off the Ipswich Road has the added advantage of causing least harm to amenities enjoyed by current residents.

We believe that it is essential that any future plans for housing are in proportion to our current population and do not place an intolerable strain on village infrastructure.

Dickleburgh Primary School, of which we are very proud, is now reaching capacity and will have no further potential for expansion.

We are also concerned that the village sewage system has limited capacity. There is a risk of flooding to the north of the village.

As a more general point, we believe that excessive loading of new houses on to rural villages would be environmentally irresponsible, increasing dependence on cars to drive to work, shop and deliver children to school.

Conclusion

Sensible, proportionate development to the south of Dickleburgh will retain the integrity and vitality of our village, while making a positive contribution to the county’s housing needs.

View the site proposals for the Greater Norwich Local Plan here:

[pdf-embedder url=”http://dickleburgh-rushallpc.norfolkparishes.gov.uk/files/2018/02/Reg.-18-Dickleburgh-and-Rushall-CP_mapBook.pdf” title=”Reg. 18 Dickleburgh and Rushall CP_mapBook”]

Download here

Sites proposals information

Greater Norwich Local Plan (GNLP) Growth Options

The GNLP has identified six options that will provide 7,000 new homes in the area covered by 2036. The public have been invited to consider which option/ s they think are most appealing. Dickleburgh is identified in the GNLP as a Service Village in the and has 51 houses already committed irrespective of which option is chosen.

The information below shows the options From a Dickleburgh and Rushall Parish Council perspective. Note, all options will affect the parish but some more than others.

Option 1 Urban Growth

This option sees the majority of the additional housing being built close to Norwich (over 75%), Then Main Towns (this could include Diss), then service centres (this could include Long Stratton), then service villages. (Around 1,200 homes will be built in service villages. There are around 100 service villages Dickleburgh is one and could therefore be selected).

Option 2 Transport corridors

Norwich and fringe gets 75% of housing. The remaining 25% (1750 homes) will be dispersed along the A11 and the A140. The villages on the A140 between Long Stratton and Diss appear specifically vulnerable, especially those near Diss. The projection is that there is likely to be additional homes built in communities along these corridors that have offered land.

This option could affect Dickleburgh.

Option 3 Cambridge -Norwich Tech corridor

The projection is that there may be some housing in service villages (There are around 100 service villages Dickleburgh is one and therefore could be selected).

Option 4 Dispersal

Diss will grow significantly could get up to 7% of the dispersal. 3,100 homes would go into villages. Villages with more sites on offer will get a bigger allocation. Dickleburgh has 13 sites offered by landowners and will almost certainly be allocated additional housing.

Of all options, this could affect Dickleburgh the most.

Option 5 Dispersal plus New settlement

A new settlement of 500 homes will be built in a transport corridor. This may well be the A140

Diss will grow significantly could get up to 7% of the dispersal. 2,600 homes into service villages. Villages with more sites on offer will get a bigger allocation. Dickleburgh has 13 sites offered by landowners and will almost certainly be allocated additional housing.

This option could greatly affect Dickleburgh.

Option 6 Dispersal + Urban Growth

Diss could grow by around 300 homes. 2,300 homes into service villages. Villages with more sites on offer will get a bigger allocation. Dickleburgh has 13 sites offered by landowners.

This option could greatly affect Dickleburgh.